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DR. CHILDRESS WANTS TO SPREAD THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT WHAT VISION THERAPY CAN ACCOMPLISH . YOU MAY HAVE BEEN TOLD NOTHING
CAN BE DONE; YOU HAVE TO TAKE DRUGS; OR THERE IS NOT TREATMENT BUT THERE IS AN ANSWER! IT IS VISION THERAPY. PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING TO LEARN HOW VISION THERAPY CAN HELP YOU OR YOUR LOVED ONE. 

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GOOD VISION MEANS MORE
THAN SEEING 20/20! 
 
Unless otherwise educated, most people assume that vision is a function of the mechanism of the eyes.  After all, basic physiology in school teaches that what we see is a result of the image projected on the retina.  Although the anatomy of the eyes is truly phenomenal, they are just the entry point for the light that stimulates our visual system.
In reality, the brain is responsible for what we see.  Specifically, vision takes place in the occipital lobe which is located in the lower rear portion of the brain's hemispheres.  Thousands of neural signals are sent from each eye to this area.  Specified cells respond to different shapes and orientations of light.  To effectively receive the signals and organize them into visual meaning, we must have two eyes clearly focusing light.  However, this does not provide cognizance or perception of objects we see.  Gaining meaning from visual stimuli requires normal visual development which begins during infancy and continues throughout early childhood.
As a child develops, they learn to see.  Babies begin to follow moving objects and reach for things within the first four months.  As eye-hand coordination an depth perception begin to develop, following objects and reaching and grasping skills improve.  Infants begin turning from side to side between four and eight months of age.  To achieve this, it requires eye focusing and eye-body skills.  Between eight and twelve months, children should be crawling, pulling themselves up and more easily and accurately locating objects.  By this time, the infant should have better use of both eyes working together in unison.  Increased accuracy improves judging distance and grasping and throwing objects.  Over the next two years of life, the visual system will continue to develop with enhanced depth perception, increased eye-hand coordination, improved binocular (both eyes coordinated) visual skills and increased ability to understand abstract terms.

When the eyes do not work together, we are unable to develop stereopsis (depth perception). When the eyes are inaccurate in pointing and focusing, objects cannot be perceived at the proper distance in space and performance will suffer.  To attain all that we are capable of, it requires excellent visual skills.

Deviations in the visual system will interfere with learning.  Images become unstable and inaccurately perceived resulting in a lowered ability to excel and comprehend.  Learning disabilities such as ADD, ADHD, and Dyslexia are often a result of a faulty visual system and can be improved by treatment aimed at eliciting the correct neural response.  VISION THERAPY improves visual skills by correcting deviations of convergence insufficiency, binocular alignment, correcting underdeveloped stage/age specific motor skills, and neural stimulation. 

                                                                                                                      

Excerpt from the book, Eden's Way: The Garden's Path to Wellness 

by Patricia Binkley-Childress 


 




Completing the symptoms checklist will help determine whether your child needs Vision Therapy:
 
Warning signs include:
  • Difficulty with skipping, hopping, or riding a bike without training wheels.
  • Cannot grasp a pencil correctly or complete tasks that require using the fingers.
  • Frequently changes preference of hand usage.
  • Loses track of time or does not understand time.
  • Clumsy
  • Inability to differentiate right from left.
  • Unable to understand geographical relationships.
  • Poor speed performance with schoolwork and other tasks in comparison to other children.
  • Short attention span.
  • Prone to motion sickness.
  • Poor drawing and writing skills.
  • Word reversal.
  • Difficulty with math concepts, abstracts, puzzles, and geometry.
  • Rubs eyes, fall asleep, loses place while reading.
  • Poor penmanship.
  • Distracted by background noise.
  • Delayed speech.
  • "Hands on" learner.
  • Avoids reading.
  • Poor reading comprehension.
  • Squints or covers one eye.
  • Frowning, frequent blinking, sensitivity to lights, or burning eyes.
  • Eye or eyes turns out or in.

These are but a few of the symptoms you or your child could be experiencing when the visual system is dysfunctional. 

Fixing these problems with Vision Therapy will make all the difference in how you or your child learns and functions.


 


WEB MD VISION THERAPY

Web Md and VT

 

 

 

CLICK HERE: VISION THERAPY AND CONVERGENCE INSUFFICIENCY

 

OTHER HELPFUL SITES: COVD



 RESEARCH ARTICLES

Research Articles



 VISION AND ITS RELATION TO LEARNING

 

Vision is more than sight. Seeing letters on a chart twenty feet away (acuity) with a response of 20/20 is considered normal sight. However, functional vision and processing requires the following:

  1. Location of the object 
  2. Identification of the object
  3. Judgment of space (depth perception)
  4. Good fixations (eye control to fixate steadily on an object)
  5. Fusion ability (using both eyes and simultaneously)
  6. Each eye pointing to the same object in space (not closer or farther away than the object and not seeing double--diplopia)
  7. Both eyes seeing simultaneously (without suppressing an eye or alternating from one eye to the other)
  8. Normal distance vision (20 feet and greater) and near vision (approximately 16 inches)

Our dominant sense is VISION. At least 80% of the human learning process occurs through vision. Vision is formed in the brain. The eyes are receptors for neurological and physiological processing to the brain. The five senses integrate in the brain for meaning and this is referred to as input. If properly stored and processed, the result is quick, precise judgment and meaning which gives "output" for learning and coordination. This results in higher academic skills and abilities.

 

Excellent functional Vision requires:

  • Visual Memory
  • Quick Identification
  • Visualization (see pictures in our mind)
  • Sequencing (visualizing in proper order)
  • Accommodative and convergence sufficiency (focusing and pointing)
  • Visual/auditory functioning (for meaning/perceptual ability)
  • Body Schema
  • Vision/gross motor (kinesthetic) and vision/fine motor (eye-hand coordination)

All of these areas affect the ability to learn in school and in life. Good functional vision is required for reading speed, accuracy, and comprehension. Without good visual binocular skills, reading and thus, learning, are inhibited resulting in omissions, miscalling, and the need for repeating.The solution to learning related vision deficits is in-office and at-home Vision Therapy. Vision Therapy is the necessary treatment to provide the environment for each person, child or adult,to reach their full potential. 

 

Mary E. Childress, O.D., F.A.A.O., F.C.O.V.D., 1995

 

Edited and revised by Patricia Binkley-Childress, 2015